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World AIDS Day

National AIDS Day Virtual Quilt

As the coronavirus pandemic continues to rage through our world, World AIDS Day is an opportunity to remember those we have lost to another pandemic. That continues to take lives across the world every day. Excellent treatments have been developed, but there is still no cure, nor a vaccination. Forty years into the AIDS pandemic more than 700,000 lives in the U.S. have been lost to AIDS and more than 1.1 million people live with HIV.

World Aids Day 2020

A Live Virtual Forum December 1, 2020
Dr. Fauci and Dr. Ho
12:00 PM – 2:00 PM

Virtual Forum

Virtual Display Program

Quilt panel making remains an important element of the Quilt. Today, the AIDS Memorial Quilt is an epic 54-ton tapestry that includes more than 48,000 panels dedicated to more than 100,000 individuals. It is the premiere symbol of the AIDS pandemic, a living memorial to a generation lost to AIDS and an important HIV prevention education tool. With hundreds of thousands of people contributing their talents to making the memorial panels, and tens of thousands of volunteers to help display it, the Quilt is considered the largest community arts project in history. (Source: https://www.aidsmemorial.org/quilt-history)

Northeast Community College has chosen to participate in a virtual display of the AIDS Memorial Quilt as an opportunity to reflect. The art and the tradition of quilting in the United States has always been a way to bring a community together – through a quilting bee, a panel making workshop, or using a quilt to warm up after a cold day on the farm. It is a symbol of comfort, of community, and of resilience.

It was gentle rain, no speeches or music, just thousands of people reading these names on this patchwork of placards up on that wall. And I thought to myself, it looks like some kind of quilt, and when I said the word "quilt" I thought of my great-grandma. ... And it was such a warm and comforting and middle-American traditional-family-values sort of symbol, and I thought, this is the symbol we should take.
— Cleve Jones, Founder, AIDS Memorial Quilt, NPR interview 2016